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ESD Definitions

1 - Electrostatic discharge (ESD) transfer of charges between bodies at different electrostatic potentials caused by direct contact or induced by electrostatic fields

2 - Electrostatic discharge sensitive devices (ESDS) discrete device, integrated circuit or assembly that may be damaged by electrostatic fields or discharges encountered in routine handling, testing or transit.

3 - ESD-susceptibility (or voltage-sensitivity) the maximum voltage at which the ESD does not suffer any ESD-damage. Comment: the ESDS are usually classified in different susceptibility classes. This is a controversial issue just to classify according to voltage level and not taking into account time, peak currents and transformed energy. A smaller voltage pulse lasting longer can cause more damage to the device than a very short but higher pulse.

4 - ESD-protected area (EPA) area in which ESDS can be handled with accepted reduced risk of damage as a result of electrostatic discharge or fields.

5 - EPA-ground uniform potential established in the work area which ensures that the electrical potential of the items handled and of everything which they are likely to come into contact is the same.

6 - EPA-ground bonding point (EBP) dedicated point to which an EPA-equipment and personnel via grounding cord can be connected.

7 - Groundable point dedicated point which can be connected to EPA ground.

8 - Proximity packaging transport material not making contact with ESDS but which is used to enclose one or more devices.

9 - Secondary packaging transport material used primarily to give additional physical protection to the outside of a proximity packaging.

10 - Low charging – exhibiting properties which minimize any charge generation. Comment: the terms “astatic” and “antistatic” should be avoided due to the different existing meanings and understandings.

11 - Electrostatic discharge shielding material barrier or enclosure that limits the passage of current and attenuates the energy resulting from an electrostatic discharge.

12 - Electrostatic Conductive material having a surface resistivity >105 Ohm et <1012 Ohm(1)

13 - Electrostatic Dissipative material having a surface resistivity >105 Ohm et <1012 Ohm (1)

14 - Insulative material having a surface resistivity > 1012 Ohm (1)

15 - Triboelctric charging electrical charging process in which charge is generated by the contact and separation of 2 surfaces which may be solid, liquid or particulate-carryong gases.

16 - Surface resistance Ohm the ration of a DC voltage applied between 2 electrodes on a surface of a specimen and the steady-state current between the electrodes.

17 - Surface resistivity Ohm the surface resistivity is the equivalent to the surface resistance of a square area, having the electrodes at 2 opposite sides.

18 - Volume resistance Ohm the ration of a DC voltage applied between 2 electrodes placed on 2 (opposite) surfaces of a specimen and the steady-state current between the electrodes.

19 - Volume resistivity (Ohm m) the ratio of a DC field strength (V/m) and the steady-state current density (A/m2) within the material. In practice, it is equivalent to the volume resistance of a cube with unit length having the electrodes at 2 opposite surfaces.

20 - Resistance to ground (Rg) the resistance between an electrode on the surface of an installed specimen and ground potential.

21 - Resistance to groundable point the resistance between an electrode on the surface of a specimen and a counterelectrode, dedicated to be connected to ground potential under work conditions.

22 - Decay time the time interval, in which a potential of a charged body is reduced from an initial value (maximum) to a defined lower value by connecting it to ground potential.

23 - Discharge time the time interval, in which a potential of a charged body is reduced from an initial value (maximum) to a defined lower value by means of forced recombination through an ionizing equipment.

24 - Voltage suppression the phenomenon of an apparent charge drainage by increasing the capacity of a charged body (e.g., getting close to a grounded electrode surface)

surface resistances, measured with the ESD S11.11 electrode are a factor 10 lower than the resulting surface restivities.